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All right, that category seems to be progressing nicely. Now, ''whether'' to subdivide it into other categories by cities, towns and villages is another matter. I personally don't think it's the best idea because of the subjective and contextual distinctions between the terms.
 
All right, that category seems to be progressing nicely. Now, ''whether'' to subdivide it into other categories by cities, towns and villages is another matter. I personally don't think it's the best idea because of the subjective and contextual distinctions between the terms.
* It is possible for a city to be very small and have a small population, though cities are generally understood as being urban in character. Near where I grew up, there is a city-island called {{linkWikipedia|Ebeye}} with only 15000 people, but situated on only about eighty acres of land and densely populated; it very much has an urban character.
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* It is possible for a city to be very small and have a small population, though cities are generally understood as being urban in character. Near where I grew up, there is a city-island called {{linkWikipedia|Ebeye}} with only 15000 people, but situated on only about eighty acres of land and densely populated; it very much has an urban character. Even my own island with a lot fewer people had a downtown area and bus routes.
 
* Similarly, places that are officially classified as towns can be as large as cities, and in some places (like the British Isles), the distinction between city and town has traditionally been an arbitrary legal difference, with towns being granted the special title of city regardless of whether other towns become much larger than them over time.
 
* Similarly, places that are officially classified as towns can be as large as cities, and in some places (like the British Isles), the distinction between city and town has traditionally been an arbitrary legal difference, with towns being granted the special title of city regardless of whether other towns become much larger than them over time.
 
* And the term village is ambiguous not only because it varies by region—a town in the United States is still usually called a town rather than a village no matter how tiny and rural it is—but because there are both urban and rural uses of village, with urban examples including the [[East Village]], [[Greenwich Village]], "gay villages," etc. When located in the U.S., it seems like places called "villages" are actually more likely to be urban than rural, and actual rural "villages" are applied instead to tiny rural settlements in other countries or in a historical or archaeological context.
 
* And the term village is ambiguous not only because it varies by region—a town in the United States is still usually called a town rather than a village no matter how tiny and rural it is—but because there are both urban and rural uses of village, with urban examples including the [[East Village]], [[Greenwich Village]], "gay villages," etc. When located in the U.S., it seems like places called "villages" are actually more likely to be urban than rural, and actual rural "villages" are applied instead to tiny rural settlements in other countries or in a historical or archaeological context.

Latest revision as of 23:49, March 15, 2020

All right, that category seems to be progressing nicely. Now, whether to subdivide it into other categories by cities, towns and villages is another matter. I personally don't think it's the best idea because of the subjective and contextual distinctions between the terms.

  • It is possible for a city to be very small and have a small population, though cities are generally understood as being urban in character. Near where I grew up, there is a city-island called Ebeye with only 15000 people, but situated on only about eighty acres of land and densely populated; it very much has an urban character. Even my own island with a lot fewer people had a downtown area and bus routes.
  • Similarly, places that are officially classified as towns can be as large as cities, and in some places (like the British Isles), the distinction between city and town has traditionally been an arbitrary legal difference, with towns being granted the special title of city regardless of whether other towns become much larger than them over time.
  • And the term village is ambiguous not only because it varies by region—a town in the United States is still usually called a town rather than a village no matter how tiny and rural it is—but because there are both urban and rural uses of village, with urban examples including the East Village, Greenwich Village, "gay villages," etc. When located in the U.S., it seems like places called "villages" are actually more likely to be urban than rural, and actual rural "villages" are applied instead to tiny rural settlements in other countries or in a historical or archaeological context.

"Settlement" is a term without so many regional or cultural connotations.

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